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October 2021

Tuesday, 19 October 2021 00:00

An Athlete’s Foot Overview

Athlete’s foot or Tinea Pedis, is a fungal infection that can produce a red, itchy, stinging, flaky rash on the uppermost layer of skin between the toes and on top of the foot. The microorganism responsible for  Athlete’s foot is called Trichophyton, which loves moist, warm environments. Athlete’s foot can spread through skin-to-skin contact at the site where the fungus lives. It can also spread indirectly, through contact with a contaminated area or object such as shoes, towels, socks and more. Untreated Athlete’s foot may spread the infection from toe to toe, or even to the hands in rare cases. If you believe you have Athlete’s foot call a podiatrist as soon as possible to determine what treatment option is best for you. 

Athlete’s Foot

Athlete’s foot is often an uncomfortable condition to experience. Thankfully, podiatrists specialize in treating athlete’s foot and offer the best treatment options. If you have any questions about athlete’s foot, consult with Julie Jurd-Sadler, DPM from Progressive Podiatry. Our doctor will assess your condition and provide you with quality treatment.

What Is Athlete’s Foot?

Tinea pedis, more commonly known as athlete’s foot, is a non-serious and common fungal infection of the foot. Athlete’s foot is contagious and can be contracted by touching someone who has it or infected surfaces. The most common places contaminated by it are public showers, locker rooms, and swimming pools. Once contracted, it grows on feet that are left inside moist, dark, and warm shoes and socks.

Prevention

The most effective ways to prevent athlete’s foot include:

  • Thoroughly washing and drying feet
  • Avoid going barefoot in locker rooms and public showers
  • Using shower shoes in public showers
  • Wearing socks that allow the feet to breathe
  • Changing socks and shoes frequently if you sweat a lot

Symptoms

Athlete’s foot initially occurs as a rash between the toes. However, if left undiagnosed, it can spread to the sides and bottom of the feet, toenails, and if touched by hand, the hands themselves. Symptoms include:

  • Redness
  • Burning
  • Itching
  • Scaly and peeling skin

Diagnosis and Treatment

Diagnosis is quick and easy. Skin samples will be taken and either viewed under a microscope or sent to a lab for testing. Sometimes, a podiatrist can diagnose it based on simply looking at it. Once confirmed, treatment options include oral and topical antifungal medications.

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact our offices located in Ijamsville and Mouth Airy, MD . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

 

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Wednesday, 13 October 2021 00:00

Plantar Warts Can Be Treated!

Plantar warts are small growths that develop on parts of the feet that bear weight. They're typically found on the bottom of the foot. Don't live with plantar warts, and call us today!

Published in Blog
Tuesday, 12 October 2021 00:00

Abnormal Gaits

An abnormal gait is a dysfunctional walking pattern. It typically occurs due to biomechanical problems win the feet and ankles. In a normal gait, the feet both spend roughly an equal amount of time in contact with the ground. Many patients complain of a painful (antalgic) gait. This type of gait is usually due to a foot or ankle injury. The patient avoids bearing weight on the injured foot, resulting in an altered gait with shorter strides and an inequality in the amount of time each foot spends in contact with the ground (with the injured foot on the ground less). A high steppage gait is a walking pattern characterized by bending the knee more than is normal while walking. Patients do this to compensate for weak anterior compartment muscles, which can cause their foot to drop or slap onto the ground. If you have an abnormal gait, it is strongly suggested that you see a podiatrist for diagnosis and treatment. 

If you have any concerns about your feet, contact Julie Jurd-Sadler, DPM from Progressive Podiatry. Our doctor can provide the care you need to keep you pain-free and on your feet.

Biomechanics in Podiatry

Podiatric biomechanics is a particular sector of specialty podiatry with licensed practitioners who are trained to diagnose and treat conditions affecting the foot, ankle and lower leg. Biomechanics deals with the forces that act against the body, causing an interference with the biological structures. It focuses on the movement of the ankle, the foot and the forces that interact with them.

A History of Biomechanics

  • Biomechanics dates back to the BC era in Egypt where evidence of professional foot care has been recorded.
  • In 1974, biomechanics gained a higher profile from the studies of Merton Root, who claimed that by changing or controlling the forces between the ankle and the foot, corrections or conditions could be implemented to gain strength and coordination in the area.

Modern technological improvements are based on past theories and therapeutic processes that provide a better understanding of podiatric concepts for biomechanics. Computers can provide accurate information about the forces and patterns of the feet and lower legs.

Understanding biomechanics of the feet can help improve and eliminate pain, stopping further stress to the foot.

If you have any questions please feel free to contact our offices located in Ijamsville and Mouth Airy, MD . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot and ankle needs.

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Published in Blog
Tuesday, 05 October 2021 00:00

Heel Stretches for the Sole

The plantar fascia is a ligament that runs along the bottom of each foot, connecting the heel bone to the toes. When this ligament is injured or inflamed, the result is usually heel and arch pain. One way to prevent or relieve tension and pain in the heel, arch, and sole of the foot is by stretching. To stretch the plantar fascia and relieve tightness under the foot, you can do a foot pull. Sit with one leg crossed over the other, then grab all of your toes and pull them as a unit back towards your shin, until you feel a pull in the bottom of your foot. Hold for 10 seconds and repeat 10 times. To massage the plantar fascia, roll a tennis ball forward and back with the bottom of your foot for 5-10 minutes a day. To learn more about plantar fascia stretches, please consult with a podiatrist.

Stretching the feet is a great way to prevent injuries. If you have any concerns with your feet consult with Julie Jurd-Sadler, DPM from Progressive Podiatry. Our doctor will assess your condition and provide you with quality foot and ankle treatment.

Stretching the Feet

Being the backbone of the body, the feet carry your entire weight and can easily become overexerted, causing cramps and pain. As with any body part, stretching your feet can serve many benefits. From increasing flexibility to even providing some pain relief, be sure to give your feet a stretch from time to time. This is especially important for athletes or anyone performing aerobic exercises, but anyone experiencing foot pain or is on their feet constantly should also engage in this practice.

Great ways to stretch your feet:

  • Crossing one leg over the others and carefully pull your toes back. Do 10-20 repetitions and repeat the process for each foot
  • Face a wall with your arms out and hands flat against the wall. Step back with one foot and keep it flat on the floor while moving the other leg forward. Lean towards the wall until you feel a stretch. Hold for 30 seconds and perform 10 repetitions for each foot
  • Be sure not to overextend or push your limbs too hard or you could risk pulling or straining your muscle

Individuals who tend to their feet by regular stretching every day should be able to minimize foot pain and prevent new problems from arising.

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact our offices located in Ijamsville and Mouth Airy, MD . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

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