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January 2021

Peripheral artery disease (PAD) is a condition that causes poor circulation and often affects the lower limbs. Taking good care of your feet is vital when it comes to living with PAD, as poor circulation in the feet can make it difficult for any sores or wounds on the feet to heal. To maintain the health of your feet, it is recommended that you wash your feet daily, dry them thoroughly, and apply moisturizer. This helps prevent cracks in the skin, which can lead to infection. Wearing shoes and socks that fit well and are comfortable and supportive, trimming the toenails properly, and examining the feet daily for any abnormalities is also important to prevent foot damage and to detect any problems early. For more information about foot care for people with PAD, please consult with a podiatrist.

Peripheral artery disease can pose a serious risk to your health. It can increase the risk of stroke and heart attack. If you have symptoms of peripheral artery disease, consult with Julie Jurd-Sadler, DPM from Progressive Podiatry. Our doctor will assess your condition and provide you with quality foot and ankle treatment.

Peripheral artery disease (PAD) is when arteries are constricted due to plaque (fatty deposits) build-up. This results in less blood flow to the legs and other extremities. The main cause of PAD is atherosclerosis, in which plaque builds up in the arteries.

Symptoms

Symptoms of PAD include:

  • Claudication (leg pain from walking)
  • Numbness in legs
  • Decrease in growth of leg hair and toenails
  • Paleness of the skin
  • Erectile dysfunction
  • Sores and wounds on legs and feet that won’t heal
  • Coldness in one leg

It is important to note that a majority of individuals never show any symptoms of PAD.

Diagnosis

While PAD occurs in the legs and arteries, Podiatrists can diagnose PAD. Podiatrists utilize a test called an ankle-brachial index (ABI). An ABI test compares blood pressure in your arm to you ankle to see if any abnormality occurs. Ultrasound and imaging devices may also be used.

Treatment

Fortunately, lifestyle changes such as maintaining a healthy diet, exercising, managing cholesterol and blood sugar levels, and quitting smoking, can all treat PAD. Medications that prevent clots from occurring can be prescribed. Finally, in some cases, surgery may be recommended.

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact our offices located in Ijamsville and Mouth Airy, MD . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

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Published in Blog
Monday, 18 January 2021 00:00

What to Do After an Ankle Sprain

Ankle sprains are one of the most common injuries that occur while playing sports. They are the result of a sudden twist or force that over stretches or tears the ligaments in the joints. The most common sign of a sprained ankle is swelling and pain in the ankle, especially when weight is put on it. Resting and icing the ankle is generally recommended for the treatment of ankle sprains. Ankle sprains that are unable to bear any weight and prohibit walking need to be checked by a podiatrist. A podiatrist will take an X-ray to make sure that the ankle is not broken, and they will be able to help with treatment of severe sprains. Another reason to visit a podiatrist is that a more severe sprain can weaken the ankle and lead to future sprains. Proper medical care can help prevent these.

Although ankle sprains are common, they aren’t always minor injuries. If you need your ankle injury looked at, contact Julie Jurd-Sadler, DPM from Progressive Podiatry. Our doctor can provide the care you need to keep you pain-free and on your feet.

How Does an Ankle Sprain Occur?

Ankle sprains are the result of a tear in the ligaments within the ankle. These injuries may happen when you make a rapid shifting movement while your foot is planted. A less common way to sprain your ankle is when your ankle rolls inward while your foot turns outward.

What Are the Symptoms?

  • Pain at the sight of the tear
  • Bruising/Swelling
  • Ankle area is tender to touch
  • In severe cases, may hear/feel something tear
  • Skin discoloration

Preventing a Sprain

  • Wearing appropriate shoes for the occasion
  • Stretching before exercises and sports
  • Knowing your limits

Treatment of a Sprain

In many cases, the RICE method (Rest, Ice, Compression, and Elevate) is used to treat ankle sprains. However, you should see a podiatrist to see which treatment option would work best with your injury. In severe cases, surgery may be required.

It is important to ask your doctor about rehab options after you receive treatment for your injury. Stretching, strength training, and balance exercises may help the ankle heal while also preventing further injury.

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact our offices located in Ijamsville and Mouth Airy, MD . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

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Published in Blog
Monday, 11 January 2021 00:00

How Effective Are Foot Stretches?

Stretching the feet can be beneficial in maintaining good foot health. Frequent stretches can make the feet stronger, which helps to maintain balance. Additionally, falling episodes may be limited when the feet are properly stretched. An effective foot stretch can be performed by rolling your foot on a tennis ball for several seconds, followed by repeating on the other foot. The toes can become stronger when toe curls and toe stretches are practiced. This can aid in maintaining good posture while walking. A simple stretch for toe curls can be completed by sitting in a chair and placing a towel under the feet, then scrunch the towel with your toes. A stretch for the Achilles tendon may consist of standing on a step, and gently lowering one heel and a time. If you would like more information about the effectiveness of foot stretches and how to perform them, please consult with a podiatrist.

Stretching the feet is a great way to prevent injuries. If you have any concerns with your feet consult with Julie Jurd-Sadler, DPM from Progressive Podiatry. Our doctor will assess your condition and provide you with quality foot and ankle treatment.

Stretching the Feet

Stretching the muscles in the foot is an important part in any physical activity. Feet that are tight can lead to less flexibility and make you more prone to injury. One of the most common forms of foot pain, plantar fasciitis, can be stretched out to help ease the pain. Stretching can not only ease pain from plantar fasciitis but also prevent it as well. However, it is important to see a podiatrist first if stretching is right for you. Podiatrists can also recommend other ways to stretch your feet. Once you know whether stretching is right for you, here are some excellent stretches you can do.

  • Using a foam roller or any cylindrical object (a water bottle or soda can will do), roll the object under your foot back and forth. You should also exert pressure on the object. Be sure to do this to both feet for a minute. Do this exercise three times each.
  • Similar to the previous one, take a ball, such as a tennis ball, and roll it under your foot while seated and exert pressure on it.
  • Grab a resistance band or towel and take a seat. If you are using a towel, fold it length wise. Next put either one between the ball of your foot and heel and pull with both hands on each side towards you. Hold this for 15 seconds and then switch feet. Do this three times for each foot.
  • Finally hold your big toe while crossing one leg over the other. Pull the toe towards you and hold for 15 seconds. Once again do this three times per foot.

It is best to go easy when first stretching your foot and work your way up. If your foot starts hurting, stop exercising and ice and rest the foot. It is advised to then see a podiatrist for help.

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact our offices located in Ijamsville and Mouth Airy, MD . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

Read more about How to Stretch Your Feet
Published in Blog
Monday, 04 January 2021 00:00

Nerves Affected by Peripheral Neuropathy

Peripheral neuropathy is a condition in which the nerves of the peripheral nervous system become damaged or diseased. These nerves are responsible for sending messages from the brain and spinal cord to the rest of the body. The nerves of the feet are often affected as well. Every nerve in your peripheral system has a specific function. Motor nerve neuropathy affects the nerves responsible for muscle movement, while sensory neuropathy affects the nerves responsible for feeling sensation. Autonomic nerves control functions such as blood pressure, heart rate, and digestion. Symptoms vary based on the type of neuropathy that you have. Broadly, the symptoms one might experience due to peripheral neuropathy include burning, prickling, or tingling sensations in the feet, sharp pains, numbness, and muscle weakness. If you think that you are afflicted with peripheral neuropathy in your feet, it is suggested that you see a podiatrist for treatment.   

Neuropathy

Neuropathy can be a potentially serious condition, especially if it is left undiagnosed. If you have any concerns that you may be experiencing nerve loss in your feet, consult with Julie Jurd-Sadler, DPM from Progressive Podiatry. Our doctor will assess your condition and provide you with quality foot and ankle treatment for neuropathy.

What Is Neuropathy?

Neuropathy is a condition that leads to damage to the nerves in the body. Peripheral neuropathy, or neuropathy that affects your peripheral nervous system, usually occurs in the feet. Neuropathy can be triggered by a number of different causes. Such causes include diabetes, infections, cancers, disorders, and toxic substances.

Symptoms of Neuropathy Include:

  • Numbness
  • Sensation loss
  • Prickling and tingling sensations
  • Throbbing, freezing, burning pains
  • Muscle weakness

Those with diabetes are at serious risk due to being unable to feel an ulcer on their feet. Diabetics usually also suffer from poor blood circulation. This can lead to the wound not healing, infections occurring, and the limb may have to be amputated.

Treatment

To treat neuropathy in the foot, podiatrists will first diagnose the cause of the neuropathy. Figuring out the underlying cause of the neuropathy will allow the podiatrist to prescribe the best treatment, whether it be caused by diabetes, toxic substance exposure, infection, etc. If the nerve has not died, then it’s possible that sensation may be able to return to the foot.

Pain medication may be issued for pain. Electrical nerve stimulation can be used to stimulate nerves. If the neuropathy is caused from pressure on the nerves, then surgery may be necessary.

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact our offices located in Ijamsville and Mouth Airy, MD . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

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Published in Blog
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