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Tuesday, 15 June 2021 00:00

Are You Suffering From Ingrown Toenails?

If left untreated, an ingrown toenail can lead to more serious concerns, such as an infection. Knowing proper nail care can help in the prevention of an ingrown toenail. Give us a call, and get treated!

Bunions are bony bumps that form on the sides of the big toes, at the base of the big toe joint. They are a common deformity that can push the big toe towards the other toes and make wearing shoes uncomfortable. While bunions can be surgically corrected, your doctor will usually suggest non-surgical treatments first. These treatments won’t cure the bunion, but they will relieve symptoms and can stop the bunion from getting worse. Wearing shoes with low heels and a wide toe box is helpful for relieving pressure on the bunion and makes walking more comfortable. Wearing orthotic inserts in your shoes can help support the foot and improve its alignment. Wearing a toe splint at night immobilizes the toe and holds it in a straighter position. Putting an ice pack on the bunion can help reduce swelling and pain. If you have bunions, please see a podiatrist to learn about more treatment options and find the right ones for you.

If you are suffering from bunions, contact Julie Jurd-Sadler, DPM of Progressive Podiatry. Our doctor can provide the care you need to keep you pain-free and on your feet.

What Is a Bunion?

A bunion is formed of swollen tissue or an enlargement of boney growth, usually located at the base joint of the toe that connects to the foot. The swelling occurs due to the bones in the big toe shifting inward, which impacts the other toes of the foot. This causes the area around the base of the big toe to become inflamed and painful.

Why Do Bunions Form?

Genetics – Susceptibility to bunions are often hereditary

Stress on the feet – Poorly fitted and uncomfortable footwear that places stress on feet, such as heels, can worsen existing bunions

How Are Bunions Diagnosed?

Doctors often perform two tests – blood tests and x-rays – when trying to diagnose bunions, especially in the early stages of development. Blood tests help determine if the foot pain is being caused by something else, such as arthritis, while x-rays provide a clear picture of your bone structure to your doctor.

How Are Bunions Treated?

  • Refrain from wearing heels or similar shoes that cause discomfort
  • Select wider shoes that can provide more comfort and reduce pain
  • Anti-inflammatory and pain management drugs
  • Orthotics or foot inserts
  • Surgery

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact our offices located in Ijamsville and Mouth Airy, MD . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

Read more about Bunions

Tarsal tunnel syndrome may not be a commonly known ailment, but have you heard of carpal tunnel syndrome? Carpal tunnel affects the hands while tarsal tunnel syndrome occurs in the feet and can cause pain and discomfort. Research has indicated that people who have arthritis may be prone to developing this condition, in addition to frequently enduring high-stress activities. Some of the symptoms that are associated with this ailment often include tired feet and ankles, and the overall foot may be numb or have tingling sensations. Some patients have pain in the Achilles tendon area, and the ankles may appear swollen. There are several symptoms that can be associated with tarsal tunnel syndrome so it is strongly suggested that you consult with a podiatrist when they first develop. This type of doctor can properly diagnose and effectively treat this condition.

Tarsal tunnel syndrome can be very uncomfortable to live with. If you are experiencing tarsal tunnel syndrome, contact Julie Jurd-Sadler, DPM of Progressive Podiatry. Our doctor can provide the care you need to keep you pain-free and on your feet.

Tarsal Tunnel Syndrome

Tarsal tunnel syndrome, which can also be called tibial nerve dysfunction, is an uncommon condition of misfiring peripheral nerves in the foot. The tibial nerve is the peripheral nerve in the leg responsible for sensation and movement of the foot and calf muscles. In tarsal tunnel syndrome, the tibial nerve is damaged, causing problems with movement and feeling in the foot of the affected leg.

Common Cause of Tarsal Tunnel Syndrome

  • Involves pressure or an injury, direct pressure on the tibial nerve for an extended period of time, sometimes caused by other body structures close by or near the knee.
  • Diseases that damage nerves, including diabetes, may cause tarsal tunnel syndrome.
  • At times, tarsal tunnel syndrome can appear without an obvious cause in some cases.

The Effects of Tarsal Tunnel Syndrome

  • Different sensations, an afflicted person may experience pain, tingling, burning or other unusual sensations in the foot of the affected leg.
  • The foot muscles, toes and ankle become weaker, and curling your toes or flexing your foot can become difficult.
  • If condition worsens, infections and ulcers may develop on the foot that is experiencing the syndrome.

A physical exam of the leg can help identify the presence of tarsal tunnel syndrome. Medical tests, such as a nerve biopsy, are also used to diagnose the condition. Patients may receive physical therapy and prescriptive medication. In extreme cases, some may require surgery.

If you have any questions please feel free to contact our offices located in Ijamsville and Mouth Airy, MD . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot and ankle needs.

Read more about Tarsal Tunnel Syndrome
Tuesday, 01 June 2021 00:00

Why Does My Child Walk on Their Toes?

By monitoring a child’s foot development in the early years—and intervening if any structural abnormalities or dysfunction is present—the child’s quality of life can be vastly improved, and serious foot complications later in life may be avoided. Some milestones in a child’s early development are: sitting up by themselves at approximately 6-7 months, beginning to walk at roughly 12 months, and walking heel-to-toe by age 3 instead of on their toes as some toddlers do while learning to walk. Toe walking after age 3 may just be a habit, or due to a tight Achilles tendon, or it could possibly be an indicator of a muscular, neurological, or developmental issue the child may have. If you are concerned about your child’s foot development, schedule an appointment with a podiatrist for a full examination and consultation.

The health of a child’s feet is vital to their overall well-being. If you have any questions regarding foot health, contact Julie Jurd-Sadler, DPM of Progressive Podiatry. Our doctor can provide the care you need to keep you pain-free and on your feet.

Tips for Keeping Children's Feet Healthy

  • Make sure their shoes fit properly
  • Look for any signs of in-toeing or out-toeing
  • Check to see if they have Clubfoot (condition that affects your child’s foot and ankle, twisting the heel and toes inward) which is one of the most common nonmajor birth defects.
  • Lightly cover your baby’s feet (Tight covers may keep your baby from moving their feet freely, and could prevent normal development)
  • Allow your toddler to go shoeless (Shoes can be restricting for a young child’s foot)
  • Cut toenails straight across to avoid ingrown toenails
  • Keep your child’s foot clean and dry
  • Cover cuts and scrapes. Wash any scratches with soap and water and cover them with a bandage until they’ve healed.

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact our offices located in Ijamsville and Mouth Airy, MD . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

Read more about How to Care for Your Child's Feet

Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is an autoimmune condition in which the body’s immune system malfunctions and begins to attack otherwise healthy joints. When the immune system attacks the lining of the joints, called the synovium, it thickens and produces excess joint fluid. Excess joint fluid and certain chemicals released by the immune system cause the joints to become inflamed. This leads to symptoms such as pain, swelling, stiffness, redness, and a feeling of warmth around the joints. RA often affects the joints of the feet, which can make walking and going about your daily activities more difficult. If you have RA that affects your feet, please consult with a podiatrist, who can help you manage this condition and maintain your mobility.

Because RA affects more than just your joints, including the joints in your feet and ankles, it is important to seek early diagnosis from your podiatrist if you feel like the pain in your feet might be caused by RA. For more information, contact Julie Jurd-Sadler, DPM of Progressive Podiatry. Our doctor will assist you with all of your podiatric concerns.

What Is Rheumatoid Arthritis?

Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA) is an autoimmune disorder in which the body’s own immune system attacks the membranes surrounding the joints. Inflammation of the lining and eventually the destruction of the joint’s cartilage and bone occur, causing severe pain and immobility.

Rheumatoid Arthritis of the Feet

Although RA usually attacks multiple bones and joints throughout the entire body, almost 90 percent of cases result in pain in the foot or ankle area.

Symptoms

  • Swelling and pain in the feet
  • Stiffness in the feet
  • Pain on the ball or sole of feet
  • Joint shift and deformation

Diagnosis

Quick diagnosis of RA in the feet is important so that the podiatrist can treat the area effectively. Your doctor will ask you about your medical history, occupation, and lifestyle to determine the origin of the condition. Rheumatoid Factor tests help to determine if someone is affected by the disease.

If you have any questions please feel free to contact our offices located in Ijamsville and Mouth Airy, MD . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot and ankle needs.

Read more about Rheumatoid Arthritis in the Feet

Have you noticed a bony protrusion on the side of your big toe? If so, you may have developed the foot condition known as a bunion. Don't let bunions interfere with your daily activities.

Monday, 17 May 2021 00:00

How Do Ingrown Toenails Develop?

The definition of an ingrown toenail is when the nail grows into the surrounding skin. It can cause severe discomfort, and it may be painful to wear shoes. It can be caused by genetic factors, wearing shoes that do not fit correctly, and improperly trimming the toenails. Additionally, a toe injury, such as stubbing the toe, may cause an ingrown toenail to develop. Patients have found mild relief when the affected nail is soaked in warm water, followed by gently pulling the skin away from the nail. If you have an ingrown toenail, it is strongly suggested that  you are under the care of a podiatrist who can offer you correct treatment techniques, which can possibly prevent an infection.

Ingrown toenails may initially present themselves as a minor discomfort, but they may progress into an infection in the skin without proper treatment. For more information about ingrown toenails, contact Julie Jurd-Sadler, DPM of Progressive Podiatry. Our doctor can provide the care you need to keep you pain-free and on your feet.

Ingrown Toenails

Ingrown toenails are caused when the corner or side of a toenail grows into the soft flesh surrounding it. They often result in redness, swelling, pain, and in some cases, infection. This condition typically affects the big toe and may recur if it is not treated properly.

Causes

  • Improper toenail trimming
  • Genetics
  • Improper shoe fitting
  • Injury from pedicures or nail picking
  • Abnormal gait
  • Poor hygiene

You are more likely to develop an ingrown toenail if you are obese, have diabetes, arthritis, or have any fungal infection in your nails. Additionally, people who have foot or toe deformities are at a higher risk of developing an ingrown toenail.

Symptoms

Some symptoms of ingrown toenails are redness, swelling, and pain. In rare cases, there may be a yellowish drainage coming from the nail.

Treatment

Ignoring an ingrown toenail can have serious complications. Infections of the nail border can progress to a deeper soft-tissue infection, which can then turn into a bone infection. You should always speak with your podiatrist if you suspect you have an ingrown toenail, especially if you have diabetes or poor circulation.

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact our offices located in Ijamsville and Mouth Airy, MD . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

Read more about Ingrown Toenails
Monday, 10 May 2021 00:00

How Shoes Affect Your Plantar Fascia

The connective tissue on the bottom of your feet between your heel and toes is called the plantar fascia. That tissue can become aggravated from overuse, wearing high heels or shoes that change the shape of your foot when you walk, being obese, aging, having certain medical conditions, or being born with flat feet or high arches. This aggravation is called plantar fasciitis, and is the most common form of heel pain. Proper footwear may help avoid plantar fasciitis or reduce pain if it has already developed. Your shoes should allow the natural movement of your foot, and have cushioning that supports pressure points—especially the heel, while being flexible and offering proper arch support. A podiatrist can recommend shoes and even orthotics that can help your individual foot structure, while offering various treatments to relieve the pain and discomfort of plantar fasciitis.

It is important to find shoes that fit you properly in order to avoid a variety of different foot problems. For more information about treatment, contact Julie Jurd-Sadler, DPM from Progressive Podiatry. Our doctor will treat your foot and ankle needs.

Proper Shoe Fitting

Shoes have many different functions. They cushion our body weight, protect our feet, and allow us to safely play sports. You should always make sure that the shoes you wear fit you properly in order to avoid injuries and deformities such as: bunions, corns, calluses, hammertoes, plantar fasciitis, stress fractures, and more. It is important to note that although a certain pair of shoes might be a great fit for someone else, that doesn’t mean they will be a great fit for you. This is why you should always try on shoes before buying them to make sure they are worth the investment. Typically, shoes need to be replaced ever six months to one year of regular use.

Tips for Proper Shoe Fitting

  • Select a shoe that is shaped like your foot
  • Don’t buy shoes that fit too tight, expecting them to stretch to fit
  • Make sure there is enough space (3/8” to ½”) for your longest toe at the end of each shoe when you are standing up
  • Walk in the shoes to make sure they fit and feel right
  • Don’t select shoes by the size marked inside the shoe, but by how the shoe fits your foot

The shoes you buy should always feel as good as they look. Shoes that fit properly will last longer, feel better, and improve your way of life each day.

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact our offices located in Ijamsville and Mouth Airy, MD . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

Read more about Proper Shoe Fitting
Monday, 03 May 2021 00:00

Factors That Lead to Turf Toe

Turf toe is a very common sports injury, particularly among football players and soccer players. It occurs when the big toe joint is sprained because of a repetitive upward bending of the joint that often occurs from jamming the toe, or pushing off while jumping or running. Turf toe gets its name because it is especially common when playing on artificial turf, where the foot is more prone to sticking to the hard surface and becoming jammed. Turf toe is commonly indicated by pain, swelling, and limited joint movement in the big toe. Treatment generally consists of rest, ice, compression and elevation, but severe cases may require surgery. Athletes who are experiencing these symptoms should consult with a podiatrist for a proper diagnosis and treatment.  

Sports related foot and ankle injuries require proper treatment before players can go back to their regular routines. For more information, contact Julie Jurd-Sadler, DPM of Progressive Podiatry. Our doctor can provide the care you need to keep you pain-free and on your feet.

Sports Related Foot and Ankle Injuries

Foot and ankle injuries are a common occurrence when it comes to athletes of any sport. While many athletes dismiss the initial aches and pains, the truth is that ignoring potential foot and ankle injuries can lead to serious problems. As athletes continue to place pressure and strain the area further, a mild injury can turn into something as serious as a rupture and may lead to a permanent disability. There are many factors that contribute to sports related foot and ankle injuries, which include failure to warm up properly, not providing support or wearing bad footwear. Common injuries and conditions athletes face, including:

  • Plantar Fasciitis
  • Plantar Fasciosis
  • Achilles Tendinitis
  • Achilles Tendon Rupture
  • Ankle Sprains

Sports related injuries are commonly treated using the RICE method. This includes rest, applying ice to the injured area, compression and elevating the ankle. More serious sprains and injuries may require surgery, which could include arthroscopic and reconstructive surgery. Rehabilitation and therapy may also be required in order to get any recovering athlete to become fully functional again. Any unusual aches and pains an athlete sustains must be evaluated by a licensed, reputable medical professional.

If you have any questions please feel free to contact our offices located in Ijamsville and Mouth Airy, MD . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot and ankle needs.

Read more about Sports Related Foot and Ankle Injuries
Monday, 26 April 2021 00:00

Different Types of Foot Wounds

Foot wounds are open cuts or sores that form on the feet. There are several different types of foot wounds. Diabetic foot ulcers (DFUs) occur due to diabetes or diabetic neuropathy. They can appear anywhere on the foot, but often appear on the big toes, balls of the feet, and the heels. These wounds typically heal slowly and poorly. Venous stasis ulcers appear on the ankles or legs due to vein damage. Arterial ulcers are caused by arterial insufficiency or poor circulation, and usually occur between or on the tips of the toes and along the outer ankles. A pressure ulcer is caused by foot immobility or by wearing improper shoes. They are usually seen on the heels or ankles. If you have any wounds on your feet, it is strongly suggested that you seek the care of a podiatrist.

Wound care is an important part in dealing with diabetes. If you have diabetes and a foot wound or would like more information about wound care for diabetics, consult with Julie Jurd-Sadler, DPM from Progressive Podiatry. Our doctor will assess your condition and provide you with quality foot and ankle treatment.

What Is Wound Care?

Wound care is the practice of taking proper care of a wound. This can range from the smallest to the largest of wounds. While everyone can benefit from proper wound care, it is much more important for diabetics. Diabetics often suffer from poor blood circulation which causes wounds to heal much slower than they would in a non-diabetic. 

What Is the Importance of Wound Care?

While it may not seem apparent with small ulcers on the foot, for diabetics, any size ulcer can become infected. Diabetics often also suffer from neuropathy, or nerve loss. This means they might not even feel when they have an ulcer on their foot. If the wound becomes severely infected, amputation may be necessary. Therefore, it is of the upmost importance to properly care for any and all foot wounds.

How to Care for Wounds

The best way to care for foot wounds is to prevent them. For diabetics, this means daily inspections of the feet for any signs of abnormalities or ulcers. It is also recommended to see a podiatrist several times a year for a foot inspection. If you do have an ulcer, run the wound under water to clear dirt from the wound; then apply antibiotic ointment to the wound and cover with a bandage. Bandages should be changed daily and keeping pressure off the wound is smart. It is advised to see a podiatrist, who can keep an eye on it.

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact our offices located in Ijamsville and Mouth Airy, MD . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

Read more about Wound Care
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